Kootenai Tribe of Idaho border vaccination clinic – June 21, 2021

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  • Jason Louie, left, chief of the Lower Kootenay Band of B.C., elbow-bumps Gary Aitken, Jr., chairman of the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho, after Louie arrived stateside during a pop-up clinic Monday at the Porthill Point of Entry north of Bonners Ferry, Idaho.

    Tyler Tjomsland The Spokesman-Review

  • A bus crosses from Canada to the United States for a cross-border, pop-up vaccination clinic held between the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and the Lower Kootenay Band of British Columbia on Monday, June 21, 2021 at the Porthill Point of Entry north of Bonners Ferry. The event was deliberately held on Canada’s National Indigenous Peoples Day and utilized buses to shuttle members of the Lower Kootenay Band of British Columbia and several community members from Creston, B.C. to the U.S., where Kootenai Tribal Health Clinic staff were waiting to board the buses and administer doses of the COVID-19 vaccine.

    Tyler Tjomsland The Spokesman-Review

  • Sean Ward, right, lowers his sunglasses for a closer look as Tracey Koch, center, a nurse practitioner with the Kootenai Tribal Health Clinic administers a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine to his wife, Lindsay, on Monday aboard a school bus stopped at the Porthill Point of Entry north of Bonners Ferry.

    Tyler Tjomsland The Spokesman-Review

  • Members of the Kootenai Tribal Health Clinic staff work to prepare vaccines as seen from inside a bus during a cross-border, pop-up vaccination clinic held between the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and the Lower Kootenay Band of British Columbia on Monday, June 21, 2021 at the Porthill Point of Entry north of Bonners Ferry, ID. The event was deliberately held on Canada’s National Indigenous Peoples Day and utilized busses to shuttle members of the Lower Kootenay Band of British Columbia and several community members from Creston, BC to the U.S., where Kootenai Tribal Health Clinic staff were waiting to board the busses and administer doses of the Covid-19 vaccine.

    Tyler Tjomsland The Spokesman-Review

  • Members of the Kootenai Tribal Health Clinic recycle used vaccine syringes during a cross-border, pop-up vaccination clinic held between the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and the Lower Kootenay Band of British Columbia on Monday, June 21, 2021 at the Porthill Point of Entry north of Bonners Ferry, ID. The event was deliberately held on Canada’s National Indigenous Peoples Day and utilized busses to shuttle members of the Lower Kootenay Band of British Columbia and several community members from Creston, BC to the U.S., where Kootenai Tribal Health Clinic staff were waiting to board the busses and administer doses of the Covid-19 vaccine.

    Tyler Tjomsland The Spokesman-Review

  • Dianne David, center in pink, gestures to her daughter Keyla David-Jim, right, who shoots a photo with Gary Aitken, Jr. left, chairman of the Kootenay Tribe, and DavidÕs cousin, Eldine Stanley, seated top-left, during a cross-border, pop-up vaccination clinic held between the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and the Lower Kootenay Band of British Columbia on Monday, June 21, 2021 at the Porthill Point of Entry north of Bonners Ferry, ID. The event was the first time Dianne and Eldine had seen each other face to face and was deliberately held on Canada’s National Indigenous Peoples Day. It utilized busses to shuttle members of the Lower Kootenay Band of British Columbia and several community members from Creston, BC to the U.S., where Kootenai Tribal Health Clinic staff were waiting to board the busses and administer doses of the Covid-19 vaccine.

    Tyler Tjomsland The Spokesman-Review

  • Jason Louie, chief of the Lower Kootenay Band of British Columbia, speaks to border patrol, members of the Idaho National Guard and tribal members following a cross-border, pop-up vaccination clinic held between the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and the Lower Kootenay Band of British Columbia on Monday, June 21, 2021 at the Porthill Point of Entry north of Bonners Ferry, ID. The event was deliberately held on Canada’s National Indigenous Peoples Day and utilized busses to shuttle members of the Lower Kootenay Band of British Columbia and several community members from Creston, BC to the U.S., where Kootenai Tribal Health Clinic staff were waiting to board the busses and administer doses of the Covid-19 vaccine.

    Tyler Tjomsland The Spokesman-Review

  • Karen Hanson, Health Director for the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho, smiles as she is given a blanket by Jason Louie, chief of the Lower Kootenay Band of British Columbia, in honor of her coordination of a cross-border, pop-up vaccination clinic. The event was deliberately held on Canada’s National Indigenous Peoples Day and utilized buses to shuttle members of the Lower Kootenay Band of British Columbia and several community members from Creston, B.C., to the U.S., where Kootenai Tribal Health Clinic staff were waiting to board the buses and administer doses of the COVID-19 vaccine.

    Tyler Tjomsland The Spokesman-Review

  • Gary Aitken, Jr., left, chairman of the Kootenay Tribe, waves to friends aboard a bus heading back to Canada, as Chief Warrant Officer 2 Shad Frazier, right, with the Idaho National GuardÕs Joint Task Force Agile Response looks on during a cross-border, pop-up vaccination clinic held between the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and the Lower Kootenay Band of British Columbia on Monday, June 21, 2021 at the Porthill Point of Entry north of Bonners Ferry, ID. The event was the first time Dianne and Eldine had seen each other face to face and was deliberately held on Canada’s National Indigenous Peoples Day. It utilized busses to shuttle members of the Lower Kootenay Band of British Columbia and several community members from Creston, BC to the U.S., where Kootenai Tribal Health Clinic staff were waiting to board the busses and administer doses of the Covid-19 vaccine.

    Tyler Tjomsland The Spokesman-Review

  • A bus crosses into Canada from the United States following a cross-border, pop-up vaccination clinic held between the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and the Lower Kootenay Band of British Columbia on Monday, June 21, 2021 at the Porthill Point of Entry north of Bonners Ferry, ID. The event was deliberately held on Canada’s National Indigenous Peoples Day and utilized busses to shuttle members of the Lower Kootenay Band of British Columbia and several community members from Creston, BC to the U.S., where Kootenai Tribal Health Clinic staff were waiting to board the busses and administer doses of the Covid-19 vaccine.

    Tyler Tjomsland The Spokesman-Review

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